Uterine Anomalies

BY IN Preeclampsia, Pregnancy Issues, Preparation for Pregnancy NO COMMENTS YET

Congenital abnormalities of the uterus, or congenital müllerian anomalies, include a spectrum of uterine abnormalities caused by abnormal embryologic fusion and canalization of the müllerian ducts to form a normal uterine cavity.  These anomalies are often asymptomatic and unrecognized, but have a reported prevalence of approximately 2-4% in reproductive age women, and up to 5-25%

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Can We Prevent Preeclampsia?

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Preeclampsia refers to a pregnancy-specific medical condition where the woman experiences high blood pressure, high levels of protein in the urine, and abnormalities in the placenta around or after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Typically, this condition resolves after delivery, however, some women have postpartum preeclampsia and continue to have symptoms for several days or weeks

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How can preeclampsia affect me and my baby?

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A preeclampsia diagnosis for a pregnant woman may increase anxiety of the outcome and health of herself and her baby. Preeclampsia is a potentially life-threatening condition and doesn’t have significantly noticeable symptoms. However, if you visit your doctor regularly and receive proper screening and testing, preeclampsia can be diagnosed and monitored for a positive outcome. Still,

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HELLP Syndrome

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What is HELLP Syndrome? HELLP syndrome is a pregnancy-specific complication that is most likely life-threatening and classified as a variant condition of preeclampsia. This syndrome and preeclampsia typically develop later on in pregnancy or some cases, after pregnancy. HELLP syndrome was defined and named due to the common indications, including: H – Hemolysis or the

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